designer of optimism
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  Citizenry: The Game  is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.   The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

  Citizenry: The Game  is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.   The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

  Citizenry: The Game  is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.   The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

  Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

  Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

 ​ Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

 ​ Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

 ​ Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

Citizenry: The Game is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city. 

The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.

The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.

Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.

Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.

  Citizenry: The Game  is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.   The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
  Citizenry: The Game  is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.   The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
  Citizenry: The Game  is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.   The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
  Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
  Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
 ​ Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
 ​ Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.
 ​ Citizenry: The Game   is an approachable medium that facilitates active engagement and questioning. Citizenry is an open-ended framework that allows for a variety of types of play. The initial setup for Citizenry: The Game involves a 5×5 grid as a foundation. As a proxy urban setting, it becomes a framework to represent the contextual relationships of the built environment of a city. The grid is an abstraction, a minimalist distillation of the fundamental elements to make a city.    The object of the game around the acquisition of Assets and Skills, towards fulfilling needs of Challenges, and given space on the Board. “Challenges” represent temporary or community-driven uses of the public spaces for increased civic participation and quality of life. Examples are Community Gardens, Food Cart Pods, Dance Party, and Skate Park.  The built environments represented are grounded in my current home of Portland, Oregon. This location has also informed the aspirational challenges to meet in the game.  Five typologies are represented in the piece of the game. A “skyscraper”, towering over the other pieces, to represent the density of an urban core. “Mixed Use” mid-rise represents 2-4 story buildings, like the ones populating Portland’s Northeast and Southeast neighborhoods, like Alberta, Mississippi, North Williams, Hawthorne, Belmont, Division, and Burnside. “Residential”, depicted as traditional pitched-roof single-family homes, may represent any type of residential areas, at a density of a typical city block. Two types of open spaces, “Vacant Lots” and “Park” are to be used as flexible, transitional spaces that meet needs of Challenges.   Installation at MFA Collaborative Design final show, Vigor Industrial, May 24 - June 11, 2013.